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How does an oil burner work?

Furnace How does an oil burner work?

Heating oil in liquid form must be turned into vapor and mixed with air before it can burn. The oil pump lifts the oil from the storage tank, pressurizes it and delivers it to the burner's nozzle that sprays the oil in a fine mist of small droplets. This process is call atomizing. These droplets are mixed with air and then ignited by a spark from the burner's ignition system.

The flame from the oil burner heats the air in a heat exchanger inside the boiler or furnace. On one side of the metal is the flame, and on the other is the water or air that circulates in the house. All of the emissions from the oil flame (mostly nitrogen, water, and carbon dioxide) are sent up the chimney.

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Oilheat Fact

Thirty-one states have crude oil reserves, and the U.S. ranks third among top oil producers. Our reserves are concentrated overwhelmingly (over 80 percent) in four states: Texas, Louisiana, Alaska, and California.


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